Are you prepared for your child’s next vaccine?

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Parenting is a blessing and if you are a parent you will agree. When you have your first child you get a lot of positive vibes starting from the first time you see your child. With your first baby, you know how to protect him/her against several diseases. With a million breakthroughs in science and so many vaccines being developed every year, it sometimes becomes difficult to keep track of your child’s vaccination schedule. The issue that most new parents face at times is that most vaccines require multiple doses and you need to ensure that the child gets the follow up vaccine shot ON TIME – Until the age of six.

Several vaccines are listed below and are recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention for children:

At Birth

  • Hepatitis B vaccine

The first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine is usually given at birth. A second dose is given at age 1 to 2 months.

Age 2 months

  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

Once the child reaches the age of 2 months, they require a series of vaccines. Mostly doctors recommend that the child is given a combination of vaccines in order to reduce multiple shots.

Age 4 months

  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

When the child is 4 months old most vaccines that are given to the child are follow ups of the vaccines provided at the age of 2 months.

Age 6 months

  • Hepatitis B vaccine
  • Rotavirus vaccine (RV)
  • Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV)

The final dose of Hepatitis B vaccine is given at 6 months along with follow up shots of vaccines received at age 2 months and 4 months.

Doctors prefer giving a seasonal influenza vaccine in fall. This vaccine is recommended for children aged 6 months.

Age 12 months

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV)
  • Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine
  • Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine
  • Hepatitis A vaccine

At this age the doctor gives the child a final dosage of Hib Vaccine and PCV. At 12 months the first doses of MMR and Varicella vaccines are given during this age and 15 months. Also, two doses of hepatitis A vaccines are given. The Hepatitis A vaccine needs to be spaced over a period of at least 6 months. These vaccines are given between the age of 12 months and 23 months.

A yearly flu vaccine is usually recommended after the child reaches 6 months of age. Depending on the age of the child, the vaccine may require one or two doses. It also depends on whether the child has received this dosage earlier. If the child crosses the age of 2 years, the vaccine can also be administered through a nasal spray.

As a parent if you miss one of the vaccines, you will definitely worry about what to do now. However, the best thing to do in such a situation is to consult a doctor and schedule a catch up vaccine. You can also ensure that you do not miss out the vaccine but getting a combination of vaccines administered in a single visit.

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